Books @ Noon--September 2021 Picks

Created on September 17, 2021, 2:51 pm

Last Updated September 17, 2021, 2:53 pm

On the first Tuesday of every month, an intrepid group of Ashland readers meets at noon to talk about the best books they've read during the month. These are their stories. [Cue CSI Theme Music]
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Bill read this story of a sickness that causes residents of a college dorm to fall asleep for long periods of time and dream in a way that gets tangled up with reality. He called it a fun and interesting read.
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Nina told the group that every American should read this book to counter the view of American history taught in schools. The book challenges assumptions many people have about our country. It is well written, but slow going because it is very thought provoking.
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Nina recommended this title as a departure for the author. Gregory is known for her historical fiction focused on European royalty and this book brings us across the Atlantic to Colonial Massachusetts.
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Ellie mentioned that JCLS' winter programming will focus on this book and the themes of gratitude, reciprocity with the land, and indigeneity found in it. Joan mentioned that she had listened to the audiobook and enjoyed it.
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Mary C recommended this book, calling it very funny and very moving. She particularly appreciated the relationship between two of the main characters, one an aging man - a fixture in his Brooklyn neighborhood - and the other a young man who he was convinced would do great things but now is involved with the local drug scene.
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Mary M recommends this book that profiles fifteen women who made a difference for the better during WWII. Each chapter discusses a different remarkable woman.
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Wendy was inspired to read this 1976 title after a recent mention in the New Yorker. She learned a lot about fly fishing, but it is a sweet story about more than fish.
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Joan recommended this historical look at the myths we know and which shape our common narrative.
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Joan recommends Rhys Bowen's books. She mentioned this title, as well as the series the next book on the list is part of.
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Several people in the group have read this book, some who were fans already and some who has not followed her closely. Joan was happy to learn more about this remarkable woman.
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Someone asked Carolyn if she had read this book, and she said she had but was not too impressed.
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Sandra appreciated this fiction book about being Muslim in America and wondered how much of the story reflected experiences from the author's life. She said she got just a little way in before she decided that she couldn't read it by herself so instead she and her husband read it together and finished it in four days. Oh, and we learned the word sesquipedalian, which means a long, multisyllabic words.
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Carolyn recommends that those interested in understanding the African American experience in the 1950s-1980s should read James Baldwins' difficult but important work. She recommends his essays, short stories, and plays, and specifically mentioned the collection of short fiction called "Going to Meet the Man."
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Bill read this book and recommended it as a good science fiction read, a bit like Isaac Asimov, clever and full of logic puzzles.
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Wendy read this posthumous collection of travel stories but found it disappointing.
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Bill enjoyed this funny book, comparing it favorably to the TV series "The Chair."
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This is the Young Reader's Edition, but Mike read and recommends the original book, as written for adults. It covers the final days of the Eisenhower administration, his advice and warnings for the future.
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